How to Not Annoy Your Subscribers with Your Email Marketing

email-marketing-smaller

If you currently have an email address, you are almost certainly signed up to at least one subscriber list. For customers, these emails can be a fantastic way to easily receive information about your favorite businesses. However, there are certain pitfalls that can make these emails more spammy than interesting.

You definitely don’t want to your email marketing campaign to make these mistakes! To help you out, here are eight tips to lower your unsubscribe rate, improve your open rate, and even endear your company to your customers by respecting their inboxes.

Make it clear to customers that they are subscribing to your emails.
The only people who should be receiving your emails are those who wanted to in the first place. Do not automatically sign someone up for your emails because they bought a product or contacted support. Always ensure there is a checkbox that clearly lets people know they are opting-in to your email list.

Send a welcome email.
This will let anyone who didn’t mean to sign up know immediately so they can cancel. It’s also a great opportunity to let people know what they have in store if they don’t unsubscribe, or even better, offer them a coupon or special deal for their interest!

Don’t overload your readers’  inboxes.
The frequency of your emails will vary by industry, but most businesses would probably do well to stick to one or two emails per week. Very few companies would need to send more than one email per day, but if you fall into this category (and really think about whether you do, because such high frequency is a sure-fire way to get unsubscribers) at least space out the emails so there’s one in the morning and one in the evening. What you do not want is for someone to get another email when they haven’t even had a chance to open the first one.

Change your subject line every time.
If the title of each of your emails is “Latest News from XYC Company” then your emails are a lot easier to ignore time after time. Try changing the subject lines up to reflect the content they’ll find inside, especially if the email includes a deal or sale!

Play around with your send time.
The hour of day that your email goes out will affect your open rate for sure, but the only way to find out what works for your customers is trial and error. While keeping track of your open rates, try altering the hour your email goes out from morning to evening, weekends and weekdays to see what works best for your particular audience.

Consider not being a regular emailer.
Lots of email marketing tip lists will tell you to keep to an editorial calendar to be sure you send out your emails at the same time every single week. The idea is that customers will forget about you if you don’t reach out often enough. While this method may work for some businesses, it’s much more important for your emails to contain great content that your customers want to read. If that means one month you send three excellent emails, but only have enough interesting content for one email the next month, that’s okay. And it’s definitely preferable to sending empty content at the same time every week!

Test across multiple email clients.
This one is hard because there are tons of email clients and, like browsers, all of them use different rules for parsing and displaying your emails. A simple is always more likely to work in multiple clients, but there are also well-tested, more complex templates included in most services like MailChimp or Mad Mimi. You can also cross-test your emails with a premium service like Litmus.

Erase the term “email blast” from your vocabulary.
We hate this term! It implies that your email campaign is an impersonal assault on your customers, and we know you don’t really feel that way. Your emails should be tailored to your customers and considerate of their time and resources. Trust us, they’ll appreciate it!